I stumbled across this page while doing a google search for some vintage printables to test out my new printer because I wanted something I would actually use and not just toss and waste the paper. I can not say thank you enough…this is the most amazing resource I have ever seen and it is so kind of you to offer these! Thank you, thank you, a million times, thank you! I’ve bookmarked for the future and I’m so excited to pour over these later today.
Putting a label on a bottle is not just printing out vintage label templates you find online and pasting it on the bottle. There are still a number of factors you have to consider. One such thing is the material you use for the label. The bottles often are exposed to different things and so things like condensation, adhesion, product handling, etc., need to be considered when choosing the material you use for the label.

I just started my Printables shop GrinandPrint in Etsy and I can’t even get one person to buy. Is it that there are so many shops now? I have a facebook page, instagram, Twitter etc. I utilize all of these including Pinterest. I can’t seem to get someone to even give me any feedback so I know what I am doing wrong. It is so frustrating. I would love to here what others think I’m doing wrong in my shop so I can make some changes. Great read though.

You can use your regular weight printer paper! Really! The idea of a printable is that it’s artwork that might be temporary or easy to switch out for something new. However, if you’ve fallen in love with one of my printables (aw, shucks!) and would like a more permanent piece of art, I recommend photo paper (matte), cardstock, premium (heavyweight) paper or archival paper. Make sure to check your printer settings and adjust the paper accordingly so it will not get stuck inside your printer. This is especially true for thicker paper.
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