The shops look great! Something I may need to look into further! My friend had a bachelorette party last weekend and her sister bought everyone bride tribe tattoos and there was a scavenger hunt. Based on your post, I think she she bought them from you, small world! Long time blog reader and podcast listener and I just love you and Gwen. Thanks for being awesome!
In this section, you can actually design and create your own card and print it out in your home to send to family and friends. There is a template to which you can upload a personal or family photo from your computer or choose one of the many images available on the site. You can also choose from among the many message options and also add your own personal note. Print it out and voila! You have your own custom paper greeting card that you can sign, seal with love and send just in time for the special occasion!

Another surprising video result:  Beth Anne found a tutorial video she created for her and Sarah's now-defunct Mommy blog on making cappuccinos at home with a frother.  That video has almost 5,000 views on it! Again, this video wasn't promoted in any way, it just sits on their Mommy blog which gets about 10-20 hits per day... so it's essentially dead.  The video is getting viewed because it's ranking for keyword phrases on Google and YouTube.

Artist Notes: Send funny Happy 32nd Birthday greetings with this design that features an overall wood effect with a humorous sentiment based on trees and wood. Front sentiment is "You look so awesome! No one "Wood" believe you're 32" Inside sentiment is "Just don't let them count your rings. Have a tree-mendous birthday!" All wood effects are digitally created.

Lia Griffith is a maker, designer, photographer, writer, and teacher. Since publishing her first paper rose and launching her handcrafted lifestyle site in 2013, Lia has developed hundreds of unique designs, templates, and tutorials to make DIY projects easier. While paper flowers are her number one passion, Lia is most passionate about helping others bring beauty, creativity, and sustainability into their lives. You can explore all of her DIY projects and become a member at liagriffith.com
More than 100 years ago Thermos used to be called a Dewar flask or Dewar bottle after its inventor  Scottish physicist and chemist Sir James Dewar. He invented it in 1892, but in 1904 lost a court case in claiming the rights to the invention to German company, Thermos GmbH, who started commertial production of vacuum flasks by the brand name "Thermos".
File Check Standard Check With the Standard Check option, we will check your file for most common issues.- Missing bleed- Missing safety margin- Convert RGB to CMYK- Wrong format sizeOur pre-press team will fix those issues, and send the file to production. You will not receive an online proof, in order to avoid delays. Online Proof Our artwork team will email you a link as soon as possible to check the PDF proof online. Please keep checking your email, as we can only print your file(s) once you check the PDF and approve it online. Beware that a delay in approval will cause a delay in production and shipment of your order. Digital Proof Print With the Digital Proof Print option, you will receive a physical proof print delivered prior to the order. This normally takes 1-2 working days. Please note, that the delivery date will be delayed, and that digital proof prints are not laminated.
One of Sarah’s biggest freelance jobs so far has been designing the Brilliant Business Planner! She landed this job by seeing a need for her service and reaching out to Sarah and Beth Anne. This is a great lesson for any entrepreneur -- it never hurts to ask. The worst thing that can happen is that someone says no, but on the flip side you could land a great job and a great partnership!
I just started my Printables shop GrinandPrint in Etsy and I can’t even get one person to buy. Is it that there are so many shops now? I have a facebook page, instagram, Twitter etc. I utilize all of these including Pinterest. I can’t seem to get someone to even give me any feedback so I know what I am doing wrong. It is so frustrating. I would love to here what others think I’m doing wrong in my shop so I can make some changes. Great read though.

I have a bit of a 'vintage ephemera' obsession of late.  I am in love with the pretty journals I see on Instagram that use old botany/floral images and vintage ladies.  So I have had a look around the internet and found the ten best free vintage ephemera printables / digi scraps sites for use in your planners, smash books, journals, collage art, mixed media and scrapbooks. Have fun browsing, scrapping and journaling through my 10 favourite ephemera freebie sites.
I sell physical prints mostly out of the fear of someone reselling. Like you said, they could still do that with a physical copy by scanning but at least that’s a little more of a hassle. I’d also hate to see my art printed on shitty paper or the colors are completely off because the buyer (or print service they use) doesn’t put in the effort to get the colors just right.
Every once in a while I'd add a new printable to my store - just single page downloads that I actually hobbled together with Picmonkey. Creating printables in Picmonkey was painstakingly slow work since it's really supposed to be used for graphic editing and creation, but at the time, Picmonkey was the only program I knew. *Fun fact, I'm a self-taught graphic designer and all I use is Picmonkey! 

I priced the Plan, Do, Review kit at $10 - much more than any printable price I had listed before. This was a significant baby step because I was learning that a comprehensive collection of printables was something that I could not only charge MORE for, but it was also something that would SELL BETTER. As that kit started to sell more than any of my other "cheap" printables, I realized that people were a lot more excited to buy my $10 product than they were to buy my $2 or $3 products. Somehow I thought that my cheaper stuff would sell faster. I was wrong and in December 2014, because of that $10 kit, I made $254.50 in sales in that one month, which was so exciting for me since I had only made $186.00 the previous 12 months combined!
I sell physical prints mostly out of the fear of someone reselling. Like you said, they could still do that with a physical copy by scanning but at least that’s a little more of a hassle. I’d also hate to see my art printed on shitty paper or the colors are completely off because the buyer (or print service they use) doesn’t put in the effort to get the colors just right.
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