Take note of color and texture. Color is a very important factor to consider when labeling your bottle. To stick with the vintage theme, rustic colors such as brown, black, and red are often used. Make sure also that the combination of colors you use does not distract from the main point of the label which is the name. Also consider some metallic textures for your bottle.Experiment with typography. The font you use for your label is also an important factor to consider. Classic fonts such as sans serif and its variations are often a good choice. Make sure the font give off a relaxing, vintage feel.Incorporate photography and art. When labeling, being minimalist has its benefits, but you can also put pictures and artworks into your labels. There are vintage bottle label templates that incorporate them seamlessly.
These next two features are for the Silhouette Studio Designer Edition.  I love this feature.  There are so many times I want to access an object within several tightly spaced objects and using the rectangle or ellipse  selection tool is an exercise in frustration.  The flexibility this feature allows in selecting objects is so awesome.  This feature gets a 5 star rating.
Kids are all about their birthdays, and we have hundreds of birthday cards for kids, including age-specific cards and featuring favorite licensed characters from Disney, Star Wars, My Little Pony, Spider-Man and many more. You'll even find twins birthday cards for those lucky enough to share a birthdate. If you're throwing a birthday party, use our fill-in-the-blank birthday invitations for quick, affordable invites.
These pretty printables are fabulous and free…you can’t go wrong with that! Decorate your home with quotes and flowers, throw a party that looks like a million bucks or wrap a gift with the perfect tag.  Oh my gosh…you are going to love these!!!  There’s a little something for everyone.  I wish I could share a photo of each one, but my blog would most likely blow up…ha!
Gorgeous watercolor florals in peaches & pinks, with splashes of mint and lavender, set on vintage distressed background papers Designed so you can create your own bo-ho style, floral vintage junk journal but can also be used in other craft projects such as scrapbooking, card making or mini albums, to name but a few. It would certainly make a great wedding guest book too. The pages measure 5 X 7 inches when folded. You can find this kit here!
I stumbled across this page while doing a google search for some vintage printables to test out my new printer because I wanted something I would actually use and not just toss and waste the paper. I can not say thank you enough…this is the most amazing resource I have ever seen and it is so kind of you to offer these! Thank you, thank you, a million times, thank you! I’ve bookmarked for the future and I’m so excited to pour over these later today.
This card has optional greetings: Happy Mother's Day!, Happy Birthday!, Happy Spring!, Thinking of You!, Thank You!, Get Well Soon!, Happy Anniversary!, Happy Summer!, Happy Gardening!, Have a Nice Day!, Just Saying Hi!, Warm Wishes!, Congratulations!, Good Luck!, You're Invited!, Spring is in the Air!, Welcome Spring!, Happy Easter!, Happy Valentine's Day!, Happy Belated Birthday!, [No Caption]
Please note that Millennial Boss has financial relationships with certain merchants mentioned. Affiliate links may be used and commission earned in this post. While all attempts are made to present correct information, it may not be appropriate for your specific circumstances and information may become outdated. Copyright © 2018. All Rights Reserved.
At the end of that month, I was at a turning point again. I had made $1000 in passive income, yes, but I knew it was mostly due to marketing to my list. How was I going to continue to make that amount in sales? I knew I couldn't keep marketing the same product to my same list month after month. At that moment, I was at a fork in the road where I almost went down the path of "Oh, maybe I'll create something new and sell that next." Luckily, I remembered a piece of advice that prevented me from doing that. I remembered Denise Duffield-Thomas (the Get Rich Lucky Bit#h lady) talking about how women have a tendency to keep creating something new over and over instead of sticking to one core, amazing product and finding endless ways of selling the SAME thing.
I'm about to start a Etsy store. I'll be selling art prints. I can't decide whether to sell downloads or physical prints. If I do physical prints I'll be using the Printful integration. I've done some research on Etsy and I see others selling downloads and from the looks of it they are making a killing. 80k in sales of 6 dollar downloads over just a few years. So there is definitely a market for it. I realize however some people might not want the hassle of printing themselves. Which is why I am questioning the digital download idea. However, as I said the digital download shops seem to be doing really well. More then just a few I've found are doing well. I realize that there is always the possibility of someone stealing my work after downloading. I'm fine that since really if someone buys a physical print they could technically make a high quality scan of it and then do the same as they might with a download. For those that offer downloads what is your experience?
I priced the Plan, Do, Review kit at $10 - much more than any printable price I had listed before. This was a significant baby step because I was learning that a comprehensive collection of printables was something that I could not only charge MORE for, but it was also something that would SELL BETTER. As that kit started to sell more than any of my other "cheap" printables, I realized that people were a lot more excited to buy my $10 product than they were to buy my $2 or $3 products. Somehow I thought that my cheaper stuff would sell faster. I was wrong and in December 2014, because of that $10 kit, I made $254.50 in sales in that one month, which was so exciting for me since I had only made $186.00 the previous 12 months combined!
The second is a receipt on behalf of the Wrought Iron Range Company of St. Louis, Missouri. The company manufactured steel ranges and kitchen equipment. The receipt is made out to J. Stanley Adams & Company of Maryland, who purchased 28 pounds of grey iron on July 10, 1921 for a total cost of $14.00. A PAID stamp, dated August 12, 1921, appears on the lower half of the receipt.
There is an overwhelming amount of items you can download on this website so it might be a good idea if you have an idea of what you are looking for so you can type it in the search button. I typed in Christmas for my most recent search. There are a ton of botanicals if you want to do a gallery wall of botanicals too…I know that is popular right now)
These next two features are for the Silhouette Studio Designer Edition.  I love this feature.  There are so many times I want to access an object within several tightly spaced objects and using the rectangle or ellipse  selection tool is an exercise in frustration.  The flexibility this feature allows in selecting objects is so awesome.  This feature gets a 5 star rating.
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