Angie, where have you been all my (design) life?! Thank you so so much for doing all of this work and for sharing it with us. Wow. Absolutely incredible collection. Tell me, please, if I want to use a printout of something here as a background image in a mixed media piece, what is the cost? (I am working on a painting series, and one will be donated to an auction for charity; the others may be placed for sale at some point.) Thank you again!
Hi Pat, there are actually 2 versions on each post, the PDF (where you click the link) and the Jpeg. The Jpeg is the picture that’s showing on the page, just click to enlarge it and then save it. The resolution is not as high as the PDF, so the quality is not quite as a good, but the size is the same and it will probably still work for most of your projects. I hope that helps!
A little bit about this print. The Christmas Carol is my husband’s favorite Christmas movie/book of all time. Every year around Christmas we are forced asked to watch every version of the movie. Some of my kids like this tradition, others do not (I fall into this category). But it’s becoming a tradition and when I saw this book in the digital library I had to use it.
Take note of color and texture. Color is a very important factor to consider when labeling your bottle. To stick with the vintage theme, rustic colors such as brown, black, and red are often used. Make sure also that the combination of colors you use does not distract from the main point of the label which is the name. Also consider some metallic textures for your bottle.Experiment with typography. The font you use for your label is also an important factor to consider. Classic fonts such as sans serif and its variations are often a good choice. Make sure the font give off a relaxing, vintage feel.Incorporate photography and art. When labeling, being minimalist has its benefits, but you can also put pictures and artworks into your labels. There are vintage bottle label templates that incorporate them seamlessly.
I priced the Plan, Do, Review kit at $10 - much more than any printable price I had listed before. This was a significant baby step because I was learning that a comprehensive collection of printables was something that I could not only charge MORE for, but it was also something that would SELL BETTER. As that kit started to sell more than any of my other "cheap" printables, I realized that people were a lot more excited to buy my $10 product than they were to buy my $2 or $3 products. Somehow I thought that my cheaper stuff would sell faster. I was wrong and in December 2014, because of that $10 kit, I made $254.50 in sales in that one month, which was so exciting for me since I had only made $186.00 the previous 12 months combined!

Hi! I ‘m new on here and haven’t had time to look through everything yet, so maybe the answer is here somewhere. These Printables are great and was wondering, what is the best paper to use to print the Printables to use as a wall hanging? I have a brother ink jet printer. Also, I was interested in the transferring and I looked at best ways to do a transfer. I didn’t see anything about waterslide decal transferring. Is that not a good method?
Computers and devices are backlit and look different depending on your personal level of brightness. Additionally, computers are capable of displaying more colors, especially brighter tones, than CMYK ink is able to replicate. When it makes sense, I convert files to CMYK to get a more accurate print rendering. Sometimes I will keep the file in RGB to give you more control over how to print it (some online vendors only accept RGB files).

During the production of paper products, cutting imperfections are to be expected - cutting can be off by a couple of millimetres from the cutting line. To allow leeway for such imperfections, you should add 3 mm of bleed on all edges of your artwork. Make sure all colours, background pictures, and elements extend to the edge of the bleed area, to avoid the appearance of white borders on certain edges after cutting. Learn more how to set up the bleed here.
You can use your regular weight printer paper! Really! The idea of a printable is that it’s artwork that might be temporary or easy to switch out for something new. However, if you’ve fallen in love with one of my printables (aw, shucks!) and would like a more permanent piece of art, I recommend photo paper (matte), cardstock, premium (heavyweight) paper or archival paper. Make sure to check your printer settings and adjust the paper accordingly so it will not get stuck inside your printer. This is especially true for thicker paper.
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